Monthly Archives: April 2016

Retail property for sale located at 531 Stephenson Avenue

Dylan Wilson is a fashion and portrait photographer based in Savannah, Georgia. He is available for assignments worldwide.531 Stephenson Avenue | Judge Realty531 Stephenson Avenue | Judge Realty531 Stephenson Avenue | Judge Realty531 Stephenson Avenue | Judge Realty 531 Stephenson Avenue | Judge Realty531 Stephenson Avenue | Judge RealtyDylan Wilson is a fashion and portrait photographer based in Savannah, Georgia. He is available for assignments worldwide.531 Stephenson Avenue | Judge RealtyPhotography: Dylan Wilson

531 Stephenson Avenue, Savannah, GA, 31405
4,949 SF
$1,250,000
Agent: Bobby Vermillion

This Savannah institution, formerly Toucan Cafe, is perfect for an investor or budding entrepreneur looking to open a new restaurant or continue with an already established large client base. The almost 5,000 square foot building comes fully stocked with all of the equipment, plans for a 60 seat outdoor addition, and a large house at the beginning of the property that can be used as a rental space for private events. In the heart of midtown, the location draws clients from many prominent Savannah neighborhoods including Ardsley Park, Habersham Woods, and the Landings, as well as large amounts of lunch traffic from the hospital and Medical Arts area.

Contact Bobby Vermillion today at 912.509.1000 to learn more about this amazing turn-key property or visit Judge Realty at 347 Abercorn Street.

Judge Realty adds ‘Federal Reserve Note’ by Jason Hughes to the Permanent Art Collection

The Judge Realty Permanent Art Collection was founded on the principles of environment, economy, and energy- the three are not only the foundational cornerstones of the collection, but the business as well. On a recent trip to New York, founder and broker-in-charge, Lori Judge had the opportunity of adding a piece, Federal Reserve Note, to the collection that is a direct representation of the economic ideology Judge supports: a free and fair market. Jason Hughes is a Baltimore based artist whose work so perfectly parallels the ideals of Judge and her company that the connection with his work was instantaneous.Federal Reserve Note by Jason HughesFederal Reserve Note by Jason Hughes

“I want everyone to see his work in an artistic and educational way. What he’s talking about is really important because so many people are unaware about current economic issues. His work is the first step in starting that conversation and allowing everyone to understand what’s happening,” said Judge.Image Courtesy of Jason HughesImage Courtesy of Jason Hughes

Hughes’s work is rooted in the abstract relationship between labor, value, and wealth, focusing on the deconstruction and repurposing of physical currency. The irony of Hughes’s discussion about currency and its cultural valuation is that when creating another recent work, Evergreen, the Federal Reserve gave him 1000 pounds of shredded, decommissioned currency, about $2.5 million that he then used to produce other forms of currency.Image Courtesy of Jason HughesImage Courtesy of Jason HughesImage Courtesy of Jason Hughes

Evergreen, a decaying pyramid built with blocks made from shredded cash has never been more relevant. Hughes said, “It’s really about how unfettered capitalism and money in politics are eroding our democracy. A pyramid is not just architectural, it’s representative of a hierarchy, and in Evergreen the hierarchy is crumbling.”

Hughes said, “Working on Evergreen was actually really fun, there were lots of happy accidents. I started washing the money to prep the material for casting bricks. By the end of the day what was left was this oily, brown, smelly water. It was fascinating to see the residue from our daily transactions, something that connects all of us as it passes through our hands. In a sense these transactions almost function on an energetic level because currency flows between us, connecting every laborer, consumer, and billionaire throughout the world. All of our hands are dirty. So I boiled this residue down until it was this thick, muddy sludge that now I’m using as a watercolor pigment. It’s all still in a very crude phase but it’s about the inevitable contradictions between the environment and the economy. A radical change is necessary to slow down climate change and the current economic policies of endless growth are only worsening the situation. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein really inspired me when I thought about what to create with the pigment. I immediately started sketching landscapes that are threatened by neoliberal policies and climate change due to those policies over the last 30 years.”

To learn more about Jason Hughes and his work visit jason-hughes.net or come see the Judge Realty Permanent Art Collection at 347 Abercorn St. Savannah, GA.

Victorian home located at 201 West 40th Street in Savannah, Georgia

Featured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge Realty

This adorable Victorian, built in 1906, in the Thomas Square neighborhood will steal your heart. Large magnolia trees, oleanders, and brick sidewalks line the charming street. A large wrap-around front porch greets you at the door with unparalleled curb appeal. Inside you’ll find 3 bedrooms plus a trunk room, soaring ceilings, gorgeous wood floors, 5 fireplaces, original trim, transom windows, huge closets, and an abundance of natural light. The updated kitchen offers custom cabinets and Corian counter tops, a half bath was added downstairs, and the full bath upstairs was updated with new fixtures to accompany the claw foot tub. A privacy fence encloses the large backyard that is perfect for parties. In addition to the amazing home, current zoning offers the potential to add a carriage house behind the home. This property is a must see in a rising neighborhood: walk two short blocks to Bull Street and enjoy the Starland Art District’s coffee shops, restaurants, local art, and shopping.

Featured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyFeatured Property: 201 West 40th Street - Pam Peterson | Judge RealtyPhotography: Wayne Moore

201 West 40th Street
$304,900
3 Bedroom 1 & ½ Bath
2,125 SF
0.09 Acres

For more information contact Pam Peterson at Judge Realty today. 912.401.2264

Studio Visit with Marcus Kenney

Marcus Kenney’s work embodies the bizarre boldness of the south in a manner as true and transparent as his dialect and demeanor. On a recent visit with Kenney, we talked about art, culture, the south, and even the television show “Naked and Afraid,” all while shuffling around his methodically berzerk studio. “Yeah, it’s chaos,” he laughed with a drawl so honest I was immediately on a farm in Louisiana.Judge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus KenneyJudge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus Kenney

Kenney, a Savannah transplant of fifteen years, has shown his work in New York, London, Miami, Chicago, Atlanta, Hong Kong, Paris, New Orleans and St Louis. His work is less of a studied idea of the south and more of a literal explosion of unabashed brain trust. “I like to create problems for myself. I create the problem, then I look around and see what’s here that can help me solve it,” he said.Judge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus KenneyJudge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus Kenney

Looking around his studio, it’s easy to see that his process is unlike anyone else I’ve met and his connection with the history of his work is unparalleled. “I was in Atlanta with a buddy, he was shopping for something for a client. We went into this interior design store and after five minutes I had to get the hell out. I found this abandoned house and went in to poke around and found this old rusted tin can. I loved it; who used it? What did they do? Where were they from? It told such a story,” he said. Kenney, moving more into self taught traditional painting practices now said, “That’s my problem with the paint: there’s no history. With found objects, people already have a connection with them, they have an intrinsic history about them. But with paint? You’re telling a story on your own and the connection is solely from the image you create.” Kenney’s past works have all been sculpture, collage, or a beautifully weird mixture of the two. Now, he’s created yet another problem: what to create without that history.Judge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus KenneyJudge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus Kenney

His work is like going to a flea market in New Orleans where all of the proprietors are lounging in caftans smoking opium and drinking absinthe- it’s stunning -as if Toulouse Lautrec had a lovechild with Nina Simone and that child embodied both of their experiences. “I found this baby doll in a flea market and became obsessed with it, so I made 300 of them and put them on the steps of The Telfair,” he said, “The ideas always come from something I find that I can’t get out of my head. Then I make something with it or a new version of it.”Judge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus KenneyJudge Realty Permanent Art Collection | Marcus Kenney

For more information about Marcus Kenney visit http://www.marcuskenney.com/ or come see his work in The Judge Realty Permanent Collection at 347 Abercorn Street, Savannah, Georgia.

Photography: Heath Daniel, Judge Realty Creative Director